Archive for the ‘Yiddish (yid)’ Category

Yiddish in Winnipeg

22 May 2012

The Ethnologue claims 5,400 first-language speakers of Western Yiddish (yih) and 1.7 million of Eastern Yiddish (ydd), though estimates vary as reported by Wikipedia.

As also reported in Wikipedia, Yiddish is a fusion of German, Hebrew and Slavic languages with borrowings from other languages. The name Yiddish itself means “Jewish.” Yiddish has made many contributions to English, and Wikipedia has a list of such words.

Today, the Mameloshen Festival of Yiddish Entertainment and Culture starts in Winnipeg, Canada. In addition to the three shows in this year’s festival, Winnipeg has a weekly Yiddish radio program on CKJS hosted by Rochelle Zucker and a women’s Yiddish reading group.

This blog post was inspired by “Yiddish is alive and well in Winnipeg” which has a lot more information about Yiddish and Yiddish in Winnipeg.

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News on Indigenous Tweets blog

18 May 2011

In addition to helping people finding tweeters in lesser-used languages on Indigenous Tweets, Kevin Scannell has a blog by the same name. (A tweet is a very short message sent out instantaneously to subscribers’ cell phones and posted on the web.)

According to “Interviews Coming Soon,” Indigenous Tweets has added 11 languages, bringing the total to 82. Some of those include languages recently discussed here, namely, Adyghe (ady), Delaware (del) and Yiddish (yid).

Another exciting post is “Not dead yet: John Gillingham on the Cornish Language.” As noted, Cornish (cor) is a language spoken in southwest England, and despite being one of the first victims to the expansion of English, Cornish has nevertheless survived.

The post is primarily an interview of John Gillingham, a student of the decline of Cornish who tweets in the language. He says that there are a couple dozen children raised in Cornish and discusses how disagreements about orthography (spelling) hindered the Cornish revitalization movement in the past.

Another topic discussed is the modernization of Cornish. In order to maintain the interest of particularly younger people, words have been developed for modern technology, and are spread through various media such as books, dictionaries, magazines and radio.

News in Brief: Language Surveys, Australia and the Torres Strait Languages, Yiddish Documentation

3 March 2011

A survey project is implementing two surveys on endangered languages, one concerning language and technology, the other about everyday use. The project appears to be a collaboration between professors at the Indiana University–Purdue University Fort Wayne and the Universidad de Puerto Rico. According to the initial page, the survey will be kept online indefinitely, with the results added to a website.

David Nathan has a site filled with resources for the languages of Australia and Torres Strait. Although some links are outdated, one leads to the AusAnthrop Australian Aboriginal tribal database, which is filled with information, including alternative names for peoples of Australia. Another leads to the Federation of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Languages & Culture, with lots of information and resources. Another link leads to music in Gumatj (gnn) on the Yothu Yindi website. Lots to explore here!

In addition to many other materials, EYDES or Evidence of Yiddish (yid) Documented in European Societies has a collection of some 6000 hours of tape recordings as part of their Language and Culture Atlas of Ashkenazic Jewry. The project also has a Yiddish course (taught in German).