Archive for the ‘Warumungu (wrm)’ Category

Top ten moments for Australian and Torres Strait languages

18 April 2011

Crikey is an Australian website with a variety of political, sports, arts and other news. They also have about 20 blogs, one of which is Fully [sic], an Australian linguistics blog that has been running for about 13 months.

Today’s post is a top 10 list of sorts, a collection of times when Australian Indigenous languages have hit it big. Entries include “Treaty,” a song including words from a Yolŋu Matha language (family), and a newspaper article on the front page of the Sydney Morning Herald written in Gumbaynggirr (kgs). Another prominent item is the use of Kala Lagaw Ya (mwp) in Qantas Airways advertisements.

There is a host of information here with great links. Be sure to keep reading till the end: Number nine is the IAD Press, which has dictionaries and guidebooks for a variety of languages, including Pitjantjatjara (pjt), Walpiri (wbp) and  Warumungu (wrm). And after number 10, there are even honorable mentions.

Advertisements

Online Cultural Heritage Tool – Mukurtu

25 March 2011

As announced on Kimberly A. Christen’s blog In Transition, the website for Mukurtu has been launched.

According to the blog entry, “Mukurtu is an open source, adaptable, digital archive and content management tool specifically aimed at the needs of indigenous communities, archives, libraries and museums globally.”

Using a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), the Mukurtu Development team has been reevaluating Mukurtu, toward an updated release.

Mukurtu is a Web 2.0 tool for online social interactions. Based on the programming language Drupal, Mukurtu includes the following features:

  • Tools for typing characters not found on the standard QWERTY keyboard,
  • Fine-grained security to restrict cultural properties as required,
  • Operates on Windows, Mac or Linux, and
  • On-the-fly recording

In addition to the Mukurtu website, learn about the program on BBC’s “Digital Planet” in an episode about ownership and openness. The lead-in to Kimberly Christen’s portion on Mukurtu starts at 8:10.

According to the “About” page, the word Mukurtu means dilly bag in Warumungu (wrm). A dilly bag is used to hold sacred objects.