Archive for the ‘Warlpiri’ Category

Walpiri speaker denied use of Walpiri in Australian state parliament

17 February 2016

According to “Aboriginal minister Bess Price denied request to speak Indigenous language in NT Parliament,” a speaker of Walpiri (wbp) who stated she feels better able to express herself in her native tongue, Walpiri, was not allowed to speak Walpiri in the local parliament because it would cause disorder. The speaker is Bess Nungarrayi Price, a minister for the Northern Territory.

The article quotes Minister Kezia Purick, speaker of the Legislative Assembly of the Northern Territory, as stating that English is the official language of Australia, but according to Wikipedia, English is the national language, not the official language, there.

Price has requested clarification of the language policy, which has allowed non-English usage from time to time in the past.

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Top ten moments for Australian and Torres Strait languages

18 April 2011

Crikey is an Australian website with a variety of political, sports, arts and other news. They also have about 20 blogs, one of which is Fully [sic], an Australian linguistics blog that has been running for about 13 months.

Today’s post is a top 10 list of sorts, a collection of times when Australian Indigenous languages have hit it big. Entries include “Treaty,” a song including words from a Yolŋu Matha language (family), and a newspaper article on the front page of the Sydney Morning Herald written in Gumbaynggirr (kgs). Another prominent item is the use of Kala Lagaw Ya (mwp) in Qantas Airways advertisements.

There is a host of information here with great links. Be sure to keep reading till the end: Number nine is the IAD Press, which has dictionaries and guidebooks for a variety of languages, including Pitjantjatjara (pjt), Walpiri (wbp) and  Warumungu (wrm). And after number 10, there are even honorable mentions.

Warlpiri>English Dictionary

16 July 2006

Steve Swartz has his 1996 Warlpiri-to-English dictionary available on the web. The link takes you directly to the file. Press the stop button on your browser (not available in IE 7.0 beta) to stop the long download and just look around.

For more on Warlpiri, check out David Nash’s Warlpiri page.