Archive for the ‘Northwest Alaskan Inupiatun (esk)’ Category

Snippets – Kawe, PNG languages disappearing, Inupiaq revitalization meetings

28 January 2011

A short article on the Huffington Post “Kep Wayag, Raja Ampat Indonesia” by James Morgan tantalizingly mentions Morgan and company documenting folk tales in the language Kawe (kgb). According to the article, Pak Lucas Ayello is the elder of Saweo Village who they were recording.

According to some sources, the Smithsonian Natural History Museum sent a team from the US to Papua New Guinea (PNG) from January 13-22. The team found that PNG languages are disappearing quickly. See “PNG language diminishing” on the Pacific Islands News Association. PNG is well known as a rich area for language diversity. The Ethnologue lists 841 languages on PNG, with 830 having speakers.

According to the Arctic Sounder, the Inupiaq Language Strategic Planning group currently has a series of meetings scheduled in Kotzebue, AK, to discuss Inupiaq (ipk) revitalization. According to the Ethnologue, Inupiaq is a term covering two varieties, North Alaskan Inupiatun (esi) and Northwest Alaska Inupiatun (esk). The meetings are open to the public.

ANLC: Pan-Alaska Resources

11 May 2007

If you want to know about a language in Alaska, the Alaska Native Language Center is the place to go. Housed in the University of Alaska Fairbanks (about 1.5 degrees south of the arctic circle mid-state), the ANLC is a research center, materials repository, promotes language revitalization and assists in the teaching of the 20 native languages of Alaska, 18 of which are not being passed on to children.

The ANLC boasts a staff of 16 and more than 10,000 story collections, dictionaries, grammars and research papers. Regular language classes are available in Central Yup’ik Eskimo (esu), Inupiaq (apparently broken up into North Alaskan Inupiatun (esi) and Northwest Alaskan Inupiatun (esk) in the Ethnologue) and Kutchin or Gwich’in (gwi) Athabascan, with other languages taught in conjunction with special topics.

A short FAQ addresses the question of whether “Eskimo” or “Inuit” is acceptable–it seems that it depends on the country. Also see that page for common expressions, orthographies, and PDF newsletters. For those Outside (and in Alaska), an impressive array of dictionaries, beginner’s texts, cassettes and more is available from their publications page.

The spark for this blog entry as well as the Dorothy Ramon Center entry comes from blogger Sophie of Finding a Voice. Thank you!