Archive for the ‘Dewoin (dee)’ Category

Languages with only one speaker

28 April 2013

According to “World’s 18 most endangered spoken languages,” there were 18 languages listed in the UNESCO Atlas of Endangered Languages with only one speaker in April 2010. (Thanks to LoL for the link to this article.)

According to the Atlas, there are now 19, but in many cases, the Ethnologue has different information. The languages listed in the Atlas with only one speaker are (by continent):

Africa

1. Bikya (byb) – the Ethnologue says there are no speakers

2. Bishuo (bwh) – the Ethnologue says there are no speakers

Asia

3. Pazeh (uun) – the Ethnologue says there are no speakers

North America

4. Patwin (pwi)

5. Tolowa (tol)

6. Wintu-Nomlaki, or Wintu (wnw) – the Ethnologue says there are no known native speakers

Oceanian, including Indonesia

7. Dampelas (dms)

8. Lae, or Aribwatsa (laz) – the Ethnologue says there are no speakers

9. Laua (luf) – the Ethnologue says there are no speakers

10. Volow (mlv) – the Ethnologue lists this and Dagmel as dialects, each with one speaker

11. Yarawi, or Suena (sue) – the Ethnologue says there are 3,600 speakers

South America (other than Brazil)

12. Chaná – it appears to not be listed in the Ethnologue (gqn appears to be different); (qs1 – Linguist List code)

13. Pémono, or Mapoyo-Yabarana (pev)

14. Taushiro (trr)

15. Tinigua (tit) – the Ethnologue says there are two speakers

16. Yaghan, or Yagán (yag)

Brazil

17. Apiaká (api)

18. Diahói, or Parintintín (pah)

19. Kaixána, or Kawishana – it appears to not be listed in the Ethnologue; (qsw – Linguist List code)

Call for bilingual education in Liberia

30 May 2011

The official language of Liberia is English. According to Wikipedia, that can refer to a variety of types of English. Wikipedia also lists 21 other languages in Liberia, a country with a population of nearly four million.

The Ethnologue lists six languages in Liberia with less than 10,000 speakers:

In “Liberians not wanting to know their indigenous language” on Newsvine, writer William Togbah extolls the benefits of indigenous languages and bemoans the fact that Liberians associate indigenous language with a lack of sophistication. At the same time, he notes that the English spoken in Liberia falls short of an international standard. His proposed solution: bilingual education.

The UNESCO Interactive Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger does not list any languages as being endangered in Liberia.