Archive for the ‘teacher training’ Category

Bodéwadmi, Keepers of the Fire

9 April 2011

Potawatomi (pot) is a language spoken in the Great Lakes region and Kansas in North America. It is spoken by the Potawatomi, who call themselves the Bodéwadmi, which means “Keepers of the Fire.”

According to the Ethnologue, there are 1250 speakers in Canada and 50 in the US. The APWAD blog says there are less than 20 in the US.

Along with the Algonquin, Nipissing, Oji-Cree and Odawa, the Potawatomi are an Ojibwe people, and one of the interesting aspects of Ojibwe culture is the use of birch bark scrolls, known as wiigwaasabak and mide-wiigwaas. These scrolls have complex glyphs (writing symbols), though according to Wikipedia, not much is known about them due to their secret nature.

Many resources are available for learning Potawatomi.

This post was inspired by “Endangered Language: Potawatomi” on the (sometimes outrageously funny) Languages Hell Yeah blog, and the many links in “Potawatomi language” on the Pokagon blog.

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Help Wanted: Language Project Coordinator

7 April 2011

Located in the southern end of the San Joaquin Valley in California, the Nüümü Yadoha Language Program at the Owens Valley Career Development Center is seeking a language project director. The pay range is USD 45-63K and the application submission deadline is April 29. A bachelor’s degree in education or documented experience in second language acquisition is required as is a valid driver’s license. See further details and apply at Language Project Coordinator. The Nüümü Yadoha Language Program is described in “Remembering a Lost Language” on the Valley Voice Newspaper website. Serving five counties in Central California, the program provides language classes in: Kawaiisu (xaw), Kitanamuk (Kitanemuk?), Lakota (lkt), Owens Valley Paiute/Western Mono (mnr), Pakanapul, Wukchumni (Yokutsan (yok)?), Yaqui (yaq) and Yawelmani. In addition to classes for children and families, the program aims to produce more teachers through Master-Apprentice Programs (2008 presentation) and Teacher Training programs.

This job was found at Language Project Coordinator on the Social Service job site.

$500K Grant for BC First Nations Language Teachers

2 April 2011

On Thursday, the Ministry of Advanced Education of British Columbia, Canada, announced a CAD 500,000 grant to the to the First Nations Education Steering Committee Society. The grant will assist First Nations in the province develop and implement programs for teachers of First Nations languages.

Specifically, programs for Developmental Standard Term Certificates will be aided. The DSTC requires three years of university training and is intended to provide a way for those with practical skills to teach kindergarten through twelfth grade. The DTSC is issued by the British Columbia College of Teachers.

Read the BC government announcement.

Native speakers of First Nations languages may also be interested in the First Nations Language Teacher Certificate, also available through the BCCT.