Archive for the ‘computing’ Category

Tłįcho app available

17 June 2012

Yes, that’s right. The University of Victoria (Leslie Saxon and Chris Coey) and the Tłįcho Community Services Agency have released a Tłįcho or Dogrib (dgr) app for the iPhone and iPad.

Filled with more than 1300 words and phrases, the Yati Dictionary app includes audio and the ability to add additional vocabulary. Also, the app is free to download and use.

TLex Suite Giveaway

21 May 2012

To celebrate the tenth-year anniversary of the start of their professional lexicography software suite, TshwaneDJe Human Language Technology is giving away free dictionary software and dictionaries, in all worth thousands of euros. Included in their giveaway are:

To learn more about their drawings, including other prizes, see TLex 10th Birthday – Free Giveaways and Upgrades. The drawing runs until midnight UTC, 27 May 2012 and is open to businesses and individuals alike.

Ktunaxa on the Internet

4 May 2012

Two days ago, Al Jazeera posted a great story on how the Ktunaxa are using the Internet and the FirstVoices website to revitalize their language, Kutenai (kut). It includes a 22-minute video. Canada: The Ktunaxa 

Another article on LiveAndTell

6 July 2011

How Do You Save a Dying Language? Crowdsource It” on the Good site.

LiveAndTell – crowdsourcing languages

1 July 2011

Biagio Arobba has created a website named LiveAndTell as a way for people to post pictures with accompanying sound files and sentences. He is also a contributor to his website, as demonstrated by his Lakota (lkt) examples at “My everyday Lakota language practice.”

Read more about the site in the article “LiveAndTell, a Crowdsourced Quest to Save Native American Languages” on the Fast Company website.

Ojibwe rap on language revitalization

24 June 2011

This blog will be on hiatus for another two weeks or so. In the meantime, here is a rap “Prayers in a Song” by Point of Contact on language revitalization, including two portions in Ojibwe:

First Nations Language Speaking Circle in Saskatchewan

5 June 2011

Dene speaker Allan Adam and Woodlands Cree Cathy Wheaton started the First Nations Language Speaking Circle in April 2009 and continue coordinating it to this day.

The group meets Tuesday nights from 7 to 8:30 at the Albert Branch of the Regina library system in Saskatchewan.

According to the First Nation Language Speaking Project page on Facebook, lessons are provided free of charge in the following languages:

Among the spectacular features of this group is the lessons that Adam has stockpiled on his website. They include video and audio learning, glossaries, links and more. In addition to the languages mentioned above, the page lists Michif (crg), with the hope of adding lessons at some point.

Another great product of this group is the flash cards provided by Cathy Wheaton on the Quizlet website. She has created 82 sets of cards with up to 35 cards in a set. Like Adam’s lessons, the flash cards are offered free on the Internet.

The contact person for the group is Natalie Owl and the lessons are on a drop-in basis. Refreshments are also provided. See the Regina Library calendar for more details.

Learning with TRAILS

30 May 2011

Teach it
Restore it
Archive it
Indigenous
Languages
Software

spells TRAILS, the name of a software program from Swifteagle Enterprises to assist people in learning languages, particularly indigenous ones.

According to the TRAILS website and private emails from Jim Swifteagle Crews, TRAILS is a platform for multimedia language learning programs. Packages include on-site customization within the continental US; additional charges apply for Hawai’i and locations outside the US.

Running on Windows XP or higher, TRAILS provides a way to incorporate images (such as photos), video (such as tribal dances) and sound files (recordings) to enhance the learning experience for the student. A field (separate line) is also available for phonetics, so you can simplify spelling to assist learnings, such as showing the pronunciation of “gnome” is “nohm.”

According to “Shinnecocks Learning an Old Language” on the Sag Harbor Express website, the Shinnecock Indian Nation purchased a TRAILS package which was installed in August 2009. The Shinnecock Indian Nation website lists this as part of a program to create a Shinnecock Language and Culture School and achieve fluent speakers. Shinnecock is a dialect of Mohegan-Montauk-Narragansett (mof), whose last native speaker passed away in 1925.

Page 4a of the TRAILS website shows a sample page of Shinnecock, with the Shinnecock word for “fox” along with a photograph and phonetics to aid pronunciation.

The packages begin at USD 18,000, which includes a computer system, printer and projector plus on-site setup and localization to meet the language needs of the purchasing community. All intellectual property rights remain with the community. Special fonts are not a problem.

Features include:

  • Classroom-ready – The packages are installed on-site with a projector so they can be put to use immediately
  • Annotated video capability – One example is a video of a ceremony with the spoken words written next to the video with an English translation
  • Data import – TRAILS can handle large quantities of data, and importing vocabulary lists from Excel, for example, is easy to do

Other packages are also available that include installation on multiple computers, laptops, and even flash drives.

TRAILS can also be found on Facebook.

News on Indigenous Tweets blog

18 May 2011

In addition to helping people finding tweeters in lesser-used languages on Indigenous Tweets, Kevin Scannell has a blog by the same name. (A tweet is a very short message sent out instantaneously to subscribers’ cell phones and posted on the web.)

According to “Interviews Coming Soon,” Indigenous Tweets has added 11 languages, bringing the total to 82. Some of those include languages recently discussed here, namely, Adyghe (ady), Delaware (del) and Yiddish (yid).

Another exciting post is “Not dead yet: John Gillingham on the Cornish Language.” As noted, Cornish (cor) is a language spoken in southwest England, and despite being one of the first victims to the expansion of English, Cornish has nevertheless survived.

The post is primarily an interview of John Gillingham, a student of the decline of Cornish who tweets in the language. He says that there are a couple dozen children raised in Cornish and discusses how disagreements about orthography (spelling) hindered the Cornish revitalization movement in the past.

Another topic discussed is the modernization of Cornish. In order to maintain the interest of particularly younger people, words have been developed for modern technology, and are spread through various media such as books, dictionaries, magazines and radio.

YouTube video of Cherokee iPhone app

17 May 2011

As mentioned on this blog (Tsalagi on the iPhone), there is an iPhone app that assists with learning Cherokee (chr). Here is a YouTube video that demonstrates the app.

The “ᏣᎳᎩ” on the initial screen of the video is tsalagi or Cherokee, written in that language.

An app is an application that works on a smartphone. A smartphone is a mobile phone with a computer-like capacity and the ability to use the internet (more than conventional mobile phones).