Where Are Your Keys?

Where Are Your Keys or WAYK is a language learning technique focused on enjoying the flow and engaging the brain. Incorporating Total Physical Response elements with the idea that learners learn better with physical energy, WAYK is an immersion learning technique (that is, not using English, for example, to help teach) that has been used since 1992. In WAYK games, learners learn by copying the movements and speech of the person leading.

The technique gets its name because you can judge the language fluency of another person based on the response to everyday questions such as Where are your keys?

Developed originally by Evan Gardner and co-developed by Willem Larsen, WAYK is also an organization that provides workshops and support to help people spread language learning with WAYK.

To facilitate the learning process, ASL or American Sign Language is used during the sessions. Because of their visual nature, sign languages can provide important clues that aid the learner.

In the below video, David Edwards is showing Chris how to “play” WAYK, using Mandarin. This is the first time for Chris to play.

 

By the end of the video, Chris has developed a keen sense of how to use the language he has been practicing in the game.

One of the goals of WAYK is to assist communities in revitalizing their languages. While WAYK works best in a live situation such as above, they are also developing a video library for situations where live communication is not possible. Here is a video with a first lesson in Chinuk Wawa or Chinook Jargon (chn).

Chinuk Wawa 1: “ikta ukuk” from Willem Larsen on Vimeo.

It is clear that the person-to-person environment is an advantage to this method. Skype, a free videoconferencing program, is also used with WAYK.

As people gain proficiency in WAYK and can learn languages more quickly, they are referred to as “language hunters.”

WAYK has two upcoming workshops on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation in Oregon, US, from July 18 to 22 and from July 25 to 29. The program will help speakers of Numu or Northern Paiute (pao) revitalize their language.

WAYK has built a community in a variety of media. See their About Us page for Facebook, Twitter, Google Groups and other resources.

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4 Responses to “Where Are Your Keys?”

  1. Where Are Your Keys? – Ethnos Project Crisis Zone Says:

    […] Link to the original site Filed in Language by Mark Oppenneer SHARE THIS Twitter Facebook Delicious StumbleUpon E-mail « Democracy and Development: The Spread of Biometric Voter Rolls No Comments Yet […]

  2. Willem Says:

    Thanks so much for sharing our work at WAYK. This is the best independent description I’ve seen of the how the game system works! And I’m impressed by the comprehensiveness of your coverage on endangered language news. It’s a pleasure to have run across this blog.

  3. Where Are Your Keys? – 2 « Living Languages Says:

    […] of the most exciting posts on this blog was about a year ago, titled “Where Are Your Keys?” WAYK is a fast immersion learning technique invented by Evan Gardner and co-developed […]

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