Indian Affairs Council of Minnesota Releases Report

Serving as a liaison between the State of Minnesota and Native American tribes located there, the Indian Affairs Council of the State of Minnesota was established in 1963 and is the oldest such council in the US.

In 2009, the Minnesota legislature authorized a feasibility study on Dakota (dak) and Ojibwe (oji) revitalization. Last month, the volunteer working group issued the report, titled “Dakota and Ojibwe Language Revitalization In Minnesota.”

The contents of the report are:

  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction: Language Loss
  • Volunteer Work Group on Ojibwe and Dakota Language Revitalization
  • Context: Language Immersion and the State of Language Revitalization
  • Working Group Responses to Issues Identified in Enabling Legislation
    • Directive 1: Existing Language Programs
    • Directive 2: Inventory of Resources
    • Directive 3: Curriculum Needs / Barriers to Teacher Training
    • Directive 4: Curriculum Needs for Teaching Students
    • Directive 5: Meeting Curriculum Needs
    • Directive 6: Creating a Repository of Resources
    • Directive 7: State Technical Assistance
    • Directive 8: Funding
    • Directive 9: Laws, Rules, Regulations and Policies
    • Directive 10: Community Interest
  • Conclusion
  • Appendices
  1. Volunteer Working Group Membership
  2. Surveys
  3. Models for Language Material Repositories
  4. Research Bibliography

A summary of the report is available on the index page of the MIAC, but the first half will likely be removed, so it is provided below. The second part is at “Minnesota’s Lakota & Ojibwe Language Report.”

  • Dakota and Ojibwe languages are in critical conditions.
  • The population of fluent and first speakers of these languages is small, and only a few first speakers live in Minnesota.
  • Virtually nobody who speaks Ojibwe or Dakota as a first language has standard teaching credentials.
  • Successful models do exist for bringing Indigenous languages from the brink of extinction.
  • More than 100 programs and activities in Minnesota provide exposure to and/or instruction in Dakota and Ojibwe languages, reflecting the importance placed on this effort by language activists, educators, tribal governments and the Minnesota   Department of Education. Few of these programs, however, recognize the essential pedagogic requirements for language   revitalization, which include a role for strong immersion programming and the leadership roles for fluent speakers.  Language immersion programs are crippled by a lack of trained teachers; a dearth of curriculum materials; policies that   adversely affect the licensure, training and availability of required personnel; and limited funding. Currently, only the University of Minnesota campuses in the Twin Cities and Duluth offer preparation for licensure for teaching across the curriculum in Ojibwe and Dakota languages; neither of these operates for teachers in grades 9-12 and subsequently languages are seldom taught formally at that level.

This post was inspired by “Minnesota: Dakota And Ojibwe Language Revitalization in Minnesota” on the Indian Peoples Issues and Resources page.

Advertisements

One Response to “Indian Affairs Council of Minnesota Releases Report”

  1. Indian Affairs Council of Minnesota Releases Report – Ethnos Project Crisis Zone Says:

    […] Serving as a liaison between the State of Minnesota and Native American tribes located there, the Indian Affairs Council of the State of Minnesota was established in 1963 and is the oldest such council in the US. In 2009, the Minnesota legislature authorized a feasibility study on Dakota (dak) and Ojibwe (oji) revitalization. Last month, the volunteer […] […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: